Artworks
Sculpture
14' x 6' x 6'
2014

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  • The 3-D Biennial is how sculptors assess the state of their art in the state, every four years. (And why is a biennial every four years? Because it alternates with a 2-D Biennial. So each is every four years, even though there’s a show every two years. Yes, it’s a little confusing. Could we do with more? Sure.) And the state of sculpture right now—at least in terms of juror Jennifer Jankauskas’s selections (she’s associate curator at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Sheboygan, Wi…
  •   STORIES HAVEN’T BEEN REALLY RESPECTABLE IN ART around here lately—let's say, from the mid-1980s until sometime last year, when everyone simultaneously got sick of ambition-made-visible as an art strategy. But now, suddenly, those artists who use narratives of all sorts in their work have become visible, even outlined in light: people like Bridget Riversmith, or Chris Larson, or Jim Denomie, or – hey!—the four women whose work is in the MCAD/McKnight Fellows show.         The ways in …
  • A GATEWAY TO ARTISTIC REPUTATION, the annual Jerome Fellowship selects five Minnesota artists whose work shows promise to receive $9,500 to make art for a year. Then we get to see the results. The knowledge that much has been given means that much is expected; the squawk, “Ten grand for that!?” is often heard after Jerome openings. But this year’s crop delivers value. The work’s as diverse as the artworld is nowadays. It’s a notable feature of the current show that each artist is doing some…
  • MULTIPLE WORLDS FOLD INTO EACH OTHER in Frank Big Bear’s brilliant work. It’s hard to comment on this show; as testimony to a long life lived in relentless service to vision, the work’s passion and intelligence is totally humbling. "I believe that I've paid my dues as a parent, as a taxicab driver, as a native, as an artist, as a survivor and as a human being,” Big Bear wrote in materials for this show. “I've earned the right to believe what I want. No one can tell me, 'that is not the nati…
  • JOHN ALSPACH’S GOT THE CRAZY BRIGHT EYES that say artist-with-a-plan. In the lobby of the new Skyscape condo building at 929 Portland he’s meeting his co-conspirator, Terrence Payne (former director of Rosalux Gallery) and the realtor who handles the building, David Abele. They’re part of Broad Cast, a floating exhibition program that uses new unoccupied space as galleries. What’s up? John and Terry have organized a show with four curators and two dozen artists that’ll go down for two …
  • DULUTH IS A CITY UNLIKE ANY OTHER. Okay, maybe that's true of all cities, but it's really true of this one. I've lived in a lot of different places, but nowhere else is as simultaneously intimate and various, worldly and homey, wild and civilized, as this one. And the most Duluth event of all, the one that best sums up the city and its music-obsessed citizens, is the annual, week-long Homegrown Music Festival. Homegrown is all Duluth or Superior bands, all week; over 200 applicants registered th…
  •   So here's the story of how a few federal dollars and one guy with a telephone and an outrageous sense of possibility enabled hundreds of artists to make art and money: Ann Klefstad: What's the "origin story" of Forecast Public Artworks?Jack Becker: Forecast grew out of the CETA program of the late seventies--you know, the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act, a jobs program. It began as City Art Productions, with sixty artists. AK: How did that happen?JB: Well, because I was interested i…
  • It’s not often you can see the work of one artist in three places at once. A pizza joint, a nonprofit exhibition space, and a commercial gallery are all exhibiting the work of Adu Gindy, a strong and well-respected painter from Duluth. I got interested in what bodies of work the different venues elicited, and how the spaces inflected the experience of the work. Gindy is prolific; any given body of work can consist of hundreds of pieces. Certain practices--drawing in paint, working out variation…
  • Camille Erickson updated the Article Tim Kaiser
    Tim Kaiser's work is performance art, sculpture that happens in time, using electronic inventions, text, imagery, sound, actions. Kaiser has become a kind of electronic bard of his region, creating a persona of the artist as a maker of freedom, along with the idea that freedom is something you have to make personally. The history and cultures of this region, lived out through generations of Kaiser's family, provide both raw and refined material for his mix of dark humor, formal beauty, and hellr…
  • Camille Erickson updated the Article News to Her
    NEWS TO ME: ADVENTURES OF AN ACCIDENTAL JOURNALIST IS A CAREER MEMOIR BY Star Tribune books editor Laurie Hertzel, mostly about her life at the Duluth News Tribune. It's an amusing and enlightening window into a beautifully drawn, very particular world. The title's a little misleading: it's true that Hertzel didn't go to J-school (journalism school, in the lingo-loving jargon of newspaper staff), but she entered newspapering young; working jobs from newsroom clerk to librarian to copy editor to …