Artworks
Acrylic and oil on layered plastic sheeting
14x14"
2017
Oil paint on plastic sheeting
28x35
2017
Oil paint on Duralar
32x62x3.5
2017
Oil on Duralar
32x62x3.5"
2018
Oil on Duralar
32x62x3.5
2018
Oil on Duralar
50wx80lx28d
2018
Oil on Duralar
19.5x72"
2017
Oil paint on Duralar
19.5x72
2018
Oil on Duralar
28x35" matted & framed
2018
Oil on plastic sheeting, framed
20x26"
2015
oil on masonite panel
16x15"
2013
Oil on Canvas
30"x40"
2016
oil on masonite panel, framed
19x23
2015
Acrylic on Masonite panel, framed
26x20"
2017
oil paint, Durlar, plastic sheeting
28w x 34h
2018
oil paint, plastic sheeting, Duralar
28w x 34h
2018
Acrylic on Masonite panel
25x35"
2017
oil on masonite panel, framed
30x20"
2017
oil on masonite panel
15x21"
oil on masonite panel
18.5x25"
2017
oil on masonite panel
15x15"
2016
Oil on plastic sheeting
25w x 30h
2015

Activity

  • Four sheets of 50x80" Duralar (a non-yellowing mylar) are hung from a wooden grid, about 8 inches apart. It's an engaging visual experience to move around it.
  • Four sheets of 50x80" Duralar (a non-yellowing mylar) are hung from a wooden grid, about 8 inches apart. It's an engaging visual experience to move around it.
  • The image consists of 3 layers of Duralar hung about an inch apart. Since it's 3-dimensional, shadows are part of the piece, and under-layers can be be glimpsed by moving from side to side. Duralar is a non-yellowing, nearly transparent mylar. It can appear gray or milky when photographed; in real life it is nearly clear.
  • A large sheet of plastic sheeting was painted and then folded several times to create the layers in this piece. Metal frame. Image 15x25, frame 28x36.
  • The image consists of 3 layers of Duralar hung about an inch apart. Since it's 3-dimensional, shadows are part of the piece, and under-layers can be be glimpsed by moving from side to side. Duralar is a non-yellowing, nearly transparent mylar. It can appear gray or milky when photographed; in real life it is nearly clear.
  • This piece is made up of 3 sheets of Duralar, a non-yellowing transparent mylar). Since it's 3-dimensional (3.5" deep), you can see "into" it as you move from side to side. It is difficult to photograph layers. The work is fully "in focus" in real life.
  • The image is intended to hold up as 2-dimensional, but there's intrigue because shadows are part of the picture, and under-layers can be glimpsed by moving from side to side. (Duralar is a non-yellowing, nearly transparent mylar. It can be difficult to photograph. In this image it appears to be dark and gray, though it is almost clear in real life. 
  • These transparent layers of Duralar, a non-yellowing mylar, are difficult to photograph. In real life, the eye sees them clearly. Of course, the layers "underneath" are obstructed, but one can catch a glimpse of them by moving from side to side. 
  • This piece is made of strips of painted Duralar, a non-yellowing mylar, layered and interwoven, then stitched onto archival foam core. It is somewhat 3-dimensional due to the curvature of the Duralar.