Sep19 to Oct19

Time

4:00 pm

venue

Contact 

This beautiful exhibit features the original paintings of Annie Young, a totally blind painter who lost her sight later in life, found art and creates fantastic paintings while inspiring others using color from her memories.  Annie gives so much credit to artist Richard Mittelstadt for helping her discover art.  Annie will be in the Main Gallery with Richard in the Cube Gallery.  Opening ceremonies start at 4pm on September 19, 2019 at the Hallberg Center for the Arts with complementary refreshments for visitors.  Stop by and meet these talented artists!

Blind Creative Ambition

I am like many souls who live a creative's life. I dream images impatiently waiting to be realized!

I also happen to be blind and readily accept the challenges related to my vocation. 

And honestly, I can't image any given day without my fingers covered in paint; without the tactile impressions navigating from my mind's eye to a woven canvas. 

My haptic and echoic memories are constantly nudging me...urging me to bring them to fruition.

There are so many painted stories waiting to be told, wanting to be felt...

is there enough time in a day, a week, month, lifetime! for me to tell them all?

- Annie Young

 

I started working in acrylic paints in earnest about eight years ago after I retired from teaching high school art education. I discovered that I could enjoy the process of painting as well as the final product while not feeling as though I had missed attaining a standard of technical skill or level of achievement in acrylic painting or abstract subject matter.

I also realized that as I worked more in abstract and non-objective subject matter, I was more relaxed in making the artwork. I also realized that I was enjoying making the composition look good and visually interesting and not stressing out over making the subject look right as I had been doing in my previous watercolor experience. Acrylic painting has been about painting whatever I want-- with or without subject matter--loose and expressionistic or tightly controlled. The strength of my abstract or non-objective acrylic paintings relies on the message (my personal voice) or the composition (how well I used the elements and principles of design).

Finally, I think of my artwork as a theater production in which the viewer is expected to temporarily suspend disbelief. For the viewer, my artwork becomes a momentary distraction—a gift of enchantment, amusement and emotional connection.

- Richard Mittelstadt

MN Artists