Go Back   mnartists.org Forums > Featured Forums > Past Events Active Archive > What’s With the Kids These Days?
Register FAQ Members List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools
coyote
Old 03-02-2009, 12:09 PM
  #201  
Post in a drought as the wild life dies, it is the coyote who grows his range and family
Quote:
Originally Posted by James Michael Lawrence View Post
And while they're at it - here's an article for younger artists to reference while considering how to proceed with their careers: http://www.mnartists.org/article.do?rid=205083 Susannah Schouweiler's profile of Polly Norman contains a wealth of insight into how one artist has integrated the business side of being an artist into her creative process. JML
Yo JML; hope your show went well; and how did it go with archiving your life's work at the MHC?

How did your "give it all way event go?"

What a wonderful way to cut down the price of Art! I think more people should flood the market with give away art- I think it would go a long way to prime the pump-after people live with your free art I am sure they will come back to you for more!!!!

Liv long and prospero!

coyote in a blond wig
Reply With Quote
James Michael Lawrence
Member
Old 03-08-2009, 03:41 PM
  #202  
Default What's With The Kids These Days?
It went very well. Way beyond our expectations. (We taped both the opening and the closing - which has made for some interesting viewing thus far...) Where we had started out with over seven hundred works on the walls - and a good three thousand pieces in boxes - by the end of the afternoon - we had less than one box left to pass on to others after the closing. Some delightful things happened - including more than one person taking away LOTS of prints to be used by kids/students as raw materials for collages, etc. A lot of that material went to the Companies To Classrooms free store out in Bloomington - a place where teachers can find supplies for their classrooms - donated by corporations (etc.) that would have thrown a lot of it out before they realized their throw-away's were someone else's craft and art materials/supplies. We donated a bunch of prints to the Urban Arts Academy - over on the South Side - which was a terrific thing to do - as we had a chance to see the classrooms/activities rooms and could envision the students/kids having a ball with the materials we gave them. We've assured everyone and anyone that they could do whatever they liked with the works - that they should consider it "raw material" to transform into something else of their own making. One artist took away an easy thousand or more works - telling us that he was going to use them in large-scale collages. I can't wait to see the results. My partner and I met with Jean Tretter at the University on Friday - and began to go over the "how and when" of having the Tretter Collection archive the works. The only problem (on my end) is that there's so much to work with - how do I choose which works to donate in hard copy format and which works to donate on disks. We will be giving the Collection every image that's been stored on disks or on drives during the last ten-plus years. I am very grateful to have the opportunity to share whatever I've made thus far with others (in the future) via the archived works - especially - because I am almost entirely self-taught and that alone might be inspirational and instructive to other artists earlier on in their struggles/efforts to make what they can with what they've got...if you get my drift. All in all - making the works was a joy in itself - but giving them away? That was pure delight! A couple last thoughts here - I am a notorious recluse - and avoid the public part of being an artist in the community as much as I can. Susan Hensel giving me the chance to put together my "dream" show - exploded the fears that usually keep me isolated - and once past those fears - the idea of putting that many works on view in one place at one time - and then giving them away ala a "Flashing Blue Light Special In Aisle..." - was a monumental risk for me. It was like setting a kid out on a traffic island in the midst of rush hour traffic and then holding your breath to see what happens. I still can't quite believe I (or we) did it. JML


James Michael Lawrence
jmlawrence86@hotmail.com

www.mnartists.org/James_Michael_Lawrence
www.mnartists.org/JML

Last edited by James Michael Lawrence : 03-08-2009 at 03:53 PM.
Reply With Quote
coyote
Old 03-10-2009, 12:27 PM
  #203  
Post welcome to the coyote way
Call susan-call nicole at the c4ia-plan for more- there is a 2,000 square foot galley waiting empty.

Coyote with a jewel in his hand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by James Michael Lawrence View Post
It went very well. Way beyond our expectations. (We taped both the opening and the closing - which has made for some interesting viewing thus far...) Where we had started out with over seven hundred works on the walls - and a good three thousand pieces in boxes - by the end of the afternoon - we had less than one box left to pass on to others after the closing. Some delightful things happened - including more than one person taking away LOTS of prints to be used by kids/students as raw materials for collages, etc. A lot of that material went to the Companies To Classrooms free store out in Bloomington - a place where teachers can find supplies for their classrooms - donated by corporations (etc.) that would have thrown a lot of it out before they realized their throw-away's were someone else's craft and art materials/supplies. We donated a bunch of prints to the Urban Arts Academy - over on the South Side - which was a terrific thing to do - as we had a chance to see the classrooms/activities rooms and could envision the students/kids having a ball with the materials we gave them. We've assured everyone and anyone that they could do whatever they liked with the works - that they should consider it "raw material" to transform into something else of their own making. One artist took away an easy thousand or more works - telling us that he was going to use them in large-scale collages. I can't wait to see the results. My partner and I met with Jean Tretter at the University on Friday - and began to go over the "how and when" of having the Tretter Collection archive the works. The only problem (on my end) is that there's so much to work with - how do I choose which works to donate in hard copy format and which works to donate on disks. We will be giving the Collection every image that's been stored on disks or on drives during the last ten-plus years. I am very grateful to have the opportunity to share whatever I've made thus far with others (in the future) via the archived works - especially - because I am almost entirely self-taught and that alone might be inspirational and instructive to other artists earlier on in their struggles/efforts to make what they can with what they've got...if you get my drift. All in all - making the works was a joy in itself - but giving them away? That was pure delight! A couple last thoughts here - I am a notorious recluse - and avoid the public part of being an artist in the community as much as I can. Susan Hensel giving me the chance to put together my "dream" show - exploded the fears that usually keep me isolated - and once past those fears - the idea of putting that many works on view in one place at one time - and then giving them away ala a "Flashing Blue Light Special In Aisle..." - was a monumental risk for me. It was like setting a kid out on a traffic island in the midst of rush hour traffic and then holding your breath to see what happens. I still can't quite believe I (or we) did it. JML
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:45 AM.

a project of The McKnight Foundation and Walker Art Center
© 2006 mnartists.org. All rights reserved.