Artworks
Walnut, holly, nickel-plated aluminum, stailess steel, nylon monofilament, hemp
34" x 20" x 32"
2014
Cherry, ebony, nylon monofilament, Stainless Steel, Aluminum
42" x 26" x 34"
2009
Maple, ebony, neoprene rubber, fiberglass, brass hardware
65" x 24" x 24"
2003
Walnut, bubinga, Maple, ebony, oak
30" x 40" x 50"
2005
Maple, birch plywood, ebony, Honduran mahogany, Glass
60" x 48" x 20"
2001
Spalted maple, ebony, Honduran mahogany, makore
9" x 9" x 9"
2014
Spalted maple, ebony, holly
18" x 10" x 10"
2013
Purpleheart, Basswood
8" x 8" x 7"
2010
Walnut, Stainless Steel, Aluminum
84" x 30" x 16"
20012

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Activity

  • Timothy Gorman updated the Artwork The Taller Sister
    The spalted maple for this hollow-turned vessel came from a tree in my friend's back yard. It is one of a series of turnings from the same tree (ergo "sisters"). The top and bottom are ebony and holly, turned and carved. For the top, I was going for the feeling of a drop of water splashing in a pond. The finish is padding laquer. $1500. The Taller Sister received the Best Turning award at the 2013 Northern Woods Exhibition in Eden Prairie, MN. It has also appeared in Fine Woodworking magazine.
  • Timothy Gorman updated the Artwork The Chubby One
    This turning is the second in a series of vessels from the same tree, the first being "The Taller Sister", below. Unlike the first, I decided on an open form with a lid for the second. I also liked the idea of lining the inside with a contrasting material to provide a little surprise when the lid was removed. The materials are spalted maple, honduran mahogany, ebony, and makore. The Chubby One received the Best Turning award at the 2014 Northern Woods Exhibition in Eden Prairie, MN.
  • Timothy Gorman updated the Artwork Cosmic Chair
    I began this project last year with the idea of designing a side chair around a radially-woven seat. I began experimenting with different materials and weaving patterns that would provide the best combination of elasticity, support, and visual appeal. I also liked the idea of extending some aspect of the pattern to the rest of the chair. It also needed to be both ergonomic (as much as is needed in an occasional chair) and structurally sound. The Cosmic Chair is built in black walnut, holly, stai…
  • Timothy Gorman updated the Artwork Three Surprises
    Each of the three "Surprises" is represented by the three images above. I wanted to create a piece that was unlike threw aside practicality in favor of elegance. This liquor cabinet is built in maple, ebony, industrial rubber, aluminum and tiger maple veneer with brass hardware and turnings. The finish is water-based analine dyes, clear nitrocellulose lacquer, and black acrylic lacquer. $5000. "3 Surprises" won the Blue Ribbon for Large Furniture Piece and Sweepstakes Prize for woodworking at th…
  • updated the Artwork Serpentine Chair
    After being somewhat dissatisfied with the results of my previous two attempts at a chair, it took me a while to attempt it again - sixteen years, to be exact. The result is this, built in cherry, ebony, stainless steel, nickel-plated aluminum, and nylon monofilament line. The weaving of the nylon and stainless was especially challenging, taking some 40 hours to complete. The finish uses a gel stain with a lacquer top coat. The Serpentine Chair won the "Peer Award" and "Best in Show" awards at t…
  • updated the Artwork Cosmic Chair
    I began this project last year with the idea of designing a side chair around a radially-woven seat. I began experimenting with different materials and weaving patterns that would provide the best combination of elasticity, support, and visual appeal. I also liked the idea of extending some aspect of the pattern to the rest of the chair. It also needed to be both ergonomic (as much as is needed in an occasional chair) and structurally sound. The Cosmic Chair is built in black walnut, holly, stai…
  • updated the Artwork A Tale of Two Bridges
    During the Summer months, I usually bicycle commute to my job. The route that I took up until last year went just below the I-35W bridge over the Mississippi river and I often looked up and marveled at the superstructure. In August of 2007, the old bridge collapsed and within a year was replaced by a safer and much sleeker design. This bench was conceived in the months following the collapse and is my interpretation of what a dialog between the two bridges might look like. "A Tale of Two Bridges…