Artworks
literature
2009

Collections

This user has no collections.

Activity

  • First Star Never tell anyone what you wished forthat fall evening. Die with that wish as youlived with it. You grew around it,like a sapling pruned back to one strong leaderby an amateur. He consulted a bookwith drawings: Right. Wrong.Then he looked up at you. Each year buried the cut deeper.Now, another northern summer:a sunlit stone, windy shadows.No or yes, or perhaps—from a distance they all look the same.What changes is the question.Every tree knows there are many waysto enter the sky.   …
  • IF POETS WRITE (AS I BELIEVE THEY VERY OFTEN DO) to explore and make sense of their own lives—and, by extension, all of life—then Margaret Hasse has managed to put her days and nights—and, by extension, ours—into remarkable order and clarity. Her new book of poems from Nodin Press, Milk and Tides, is her first since In A Sheep’s Eye, Darling (1988), though she has published regularly and been widely anthologized during the intervening years. Milk and Tides has a novel’s coherence: a prolog…
  • IT'S ALMOST SEVEN IN THE EVENING ON MAY 28, and people are gathering in the fourth floor rotunda of the library at the University of Minnesota Duluth for a publication event: Ellie Schoenfeld will read from her new book, The Dark Honey: New and Used Poems. Even the title tells us that the poems will feature the Schoenfeld trademark humor. What is a "used" poem? Previously published, yes...but I have no doubt these poems have in fact been employed, as poems often are, to comfort, or to amuse. The…
  • HOLLOWAYS                                                                                 Footpaths worn house to house in grass and snow for hide and seek, mail's daily rounds, our cupboards found wanting. We angle out at the corner on 35th, we line and knot at the post office, corner store, bus stop, and coffee shop. Earnest pairs of Mormons ply the sidewalks. Brash boys pool at corners, the girls circle wide. Dail…
  • JILL BRECKENRIDGE'S CIVIL BLOOD, PUBLISHED IN 1986, CREATED QUITE A STIR. It was an important book regionally and nationally, a richly imagined, thoroughly researched evocation of the Civil War, through poems and prose, as experienced by General John Cabell Breckinridge and a cast of souls involved in that terrible conflict. Nodin Press has just released her new collection of poetry, The Gravity of Flesh, and it was well worth the wait. It's a much more intimate book, but like Civil Blood, the n…
  • Lake Street Driving west today post-sunset,the boys in the car, not a cloud,oak twigs like capillaries inthe clean blue skin of the evening,and I said Man, I love this timeof day at this time of the year.From his quilted cocoon in theback seat, the baby made one ofhis wet friendly sibilant sounds.The ten-year-old, though, beside me,looked up and said What do you mean?I did not say A sky like that,the rose wash at the horizon,the crystalline bigness, the grace,breathes into me a quiet sortof glor…
  • THE LILACS ARE IN FULL BLOOM, AS IF ON CUE.  Duluth's Deborah Gordon Cooper is reading tonight from her new book of poems, Under the Influence of Lilacs, and people are streaming into the Congregational Church on Superior Street for the event.  Local folk hero, Sara Thomsen will also sing during the program, and to add to the pleasures of the evening, upon entering the the church, attendees are greeted by foyer tables full of fresh rhubarb bars and coffee, strawberries and chocolate truffles -…
  • AFTER I READ THE FINAL WORD ("HOME") OF THE DANCE BOOTS, Linda LeGarde Grover's new collection of stories, I turned back to the first words ("We Ojibwe believe") and began again. I wanted to extend my stay in the world the book creates. It's a compelling place of tradition, generosity, endurance, painful memories and events, spiritual transcendence, love and humor. LeGarde Grover won the prestigious Flannery O'Connor Award in short fiction for this book, and I can't imagine a more worthy recipie…
  • Polygamy    Some men don't hate marriage, or slavery for that matter. Nor can they ever own enough land.   When I was a girl back on the farm I surprised a wild tomcat in the hayloft. He was eating a kitten,   its eyes still shut tight like apple buds.  The shutter clicked as he looked at me, his expression fixed.   I still think he knew what he was doing,  though not why, which makes him almost human,   or makes us almost feline. I could hear the other kittens  mewing softly    somew…
  • "It eases your heart to read Joyce Sutphen." -- Garrison Keillor OUR NEW MINNESOTA POET LAUREATE, JOYCE SUTPHEN, was born and grew up on a working farm near St. Joseph in Stearns County. This rural background is something she shares with our first Laureate, Robert Bly. She is the eldest child in a large, talented, close-knit family. Sutphen's latest book, First Words (Red Dragonfly Press, 2010) describes her family's farm and her early years; it reads like a memoir in poems. And like all good me…