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  • Mn Artists updated the Article Tell It Slant
    “Does one’s integrity lie in what he is not able to do?” Flannery O'Connor asks in the preface to the 1962 version of her debut novel Wise Blood. This question sets up her defense of the novel’s role to deepen, not simplify, the mystery of freedom. Her story’s protagonist, war veteran Hazel Motes, moves to the fictional Tennessee town of Taulkinham where he publicly denounces Jesus in favor of a sort of antireligion, his “church of Christ without Christ,” in order to become free fr…
  • Mn Artists updated the Article To Tell It Slant
    “Does one’s integrity lie in what he is not able to do?” Flannery O'Connor asks in the preface to the 1962 version of her debut novel Wise Blood. This question sets up her defense of the novel’s role to deepen, not simplify, the mystery of freedom. Her story’s protagonist, war veteran Hazel Motes, moves to the fictional Tennessee town of Taulkinham where he publicly denounces Jesus in favor of a sort of antireligion, his “church of Christ without Christ,” in order to become free fr…
  • Julie Buffalohead’s coyotes are more domesticated than the ones from the early Native American trickster tales. The first generations of coyote tricksters were wily firebrands -- sometimes heroes, sometimes fools, and almost always males. In her first mid-career retrospective, Coyote Dreams at the Minnesota Museum of American Art, Buffalohead’s gang of woodland creatures float against pink and red backgrounds, wear skirts, eat freshly baked cookies, and hold umbrellas over dead bunnies. The …
  • Julie Buffalohead’s coyotes are more domesticated than the ones from the early Native American trickster tales. The first generations of coyote tricksters were wily firebrands -- sometimes heroes, sometimes fools, and almost always males. In her first mid-career retrospective, Coyote Dreams at the Minnesota Museum of American Art, Buffalohead’s gang of woodland creatures float against pink and red backgrounds, wear skirts, eat freshly baked cookies, and hold umbrellas over dead bunnies. The …
  • Julie Buffalohead’s coyotes are more domesticated than the ones from the early Native American trickster tales. The first generations of coyote tricksters were wily firebrands -- sometimes heroes, sometimes fools, and almost always males. In her first mid-career retrospective, Coyote Dreams at the Minnesota Museum of American Art, Buffalohead’s gang of woodland creatures float against pink and red backgrounds, wear skirts, eat freshly baked cookies, and hold umbrellas over dead bunnies. The …
  • Julie Buffalohead’s coyotes are more domesticated than the ones from the early Native American trickster tales. The first generations of coyote tricksters were wily firebrands -- sometimes heroes, sometimes fools, and almost always males. In her first mid-career retrospective, Coyote Dreams at the Minnesota Museum of American Art, Buffalohead’s gang of woodland creatures float against pink and red backgrounds, wear skirts, eat freshly baked cookies, and hold umbrellas over dead bunnies. The …